The Golden Shower Tree

Calling the golden shower tree and its flowers “beautiful” would be an understatement. In fact, I couldn’t find any word in the English dictionary to aptly describe its loveliness.

 

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Kadri Park Mangaluru has plenty of golden shower trees, and it almost looks as if they are on the verge of showering gold on the fitness enthusiasts who run, walk, or jog past them. You will find a few golden shower trees by the Edapally – Panvel highway, opposite the skating rink and just outside the park.

 

The golden shower tree, also known as the cassia fistula, is a native of South Asia. Tamil writers have mentioned it in their works. It is Thailand’s national tree and its beautiful yellow flower is the national flower of Thailand. The people of Kerala love the golden shower tree and its blooms so much that they consider it to be their state flower. Public parks are almost incomplete without it. I am surprised I haven’t seen a golden shower tree at Pilikula.

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As for names, it has several—golden shower tree, Cassia fistula, Indian laburnum, and purging cassia. While the Spanish call it Cana fistula, the Kannada speakers call it kakke mara.

 

The tree is not only ornamental, but also medicinal.

  • The pulp of the Cassia fistula fruit is believed to be an excellent laxative.
  • It can cure common cold. To relieve a running rose, you just have to smell the smoke from a burning Cassia fistula root.
  • The root is used to prepare a tonic that can reduce fever.
  • Applying the Cassia fistula pulp around the navel can relieve flatulence.
  • Cassia fistula leaves can relieve skin irritation, pain, and swelling.

But you must not consume any part of the tree without first consulting your Ayurvedic doctor.

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10 thoughts on “The Golden Shower Tree

  1. Pingback: Cycling Lessons – Learning to Let Go | Scribbles

  2. Your photos are so glorious, Sonia. I wish I had been able to find photos this detailed when I was trying to research the tree, but they only showed shots of the entire tree. My gardener tells me that in Mexico, it is called Lluvia del Oro, which means Golden Rain! He also tells me we didn’t plant the tree. It evidently came up as a volunteer, perhaps from seed dropped by birds. There are two larger trees in a yard down the block but my view of them is blocked by a very large palm tree athat is slow growing so the head is still near the ground. What a beautiful tree… and a new one for both my memory and my vocabulary. Thank you so much for being my teacher… Judy

    Liked by 1 person

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